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Material and Technologies for Solar Energy

Published April 2009

The development of alternative energy has become a major effort of many economies and companies. The impetus for this investment in capital and research has several major facets...
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Will the Real Carbon Footprint Please Stand Up?

Published December 2008

Sensitivities of Ethylene Carbon-Footprints to Feedstock Type, Allocation Method and Location.
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Carbon Capture Via Oxycombustion

Published December 2008

One of the options currently being investigated for carbon capture from coal-fired electric power generation is to use a predominately oxygen feed to the boiler.
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Materials and Chemicals for New Energy Generation

Published January 2007

Report Abstract

Alternative energy—especially sustainable energy—has attracted the attention of many in government and industry. It is seen as a way of reducing reliance on fossil fuels and reducing greenhouse gas generation.
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Gasoline Octane Improvers/Oxygenates

Published April 2006

Report Abstract

Gasolines with an octane rating that satisfies market requirements are produced in refineries by blending various refinery streams that differ in composition, boiling range and octane ratings. The octane number is an expression of the antiknock property of gasoline and is defined as the percentage, by volume, of isooctane (assigned an octane number of 100) that must be mixed with n-heptane (assigned an octane number of 0) in order to match the knock intensity of the fuel that is undergoing test. Until recently, methyl tertiary-butyl ether (MTBE) was the predominant oxygenate used worldwide; however, a major shift to alternative oxygenates such as ethyl alcohol (ethanol) and ETBE is starting to occur.
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Eco-Efficient Chemical Processes

Published September 2007

Report Abstract


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Green Building Materials

Published December 2007

Report Abstract

For centuries, humans have impacted their environment in ways both large and small. Most of this environmental impact has stemmed from the basic human need for shelter. In creating shelter, mankind has had an effect on the environment—cutting trees, clearing land, and creating waste by-products, as well as bringing about other unintentional environmental consequences.
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Oil Field Chemicals

Report Abstract

The world market for oil field chemicals, expressed in sales dollars at the service company level, reached almost $8 billion in 2004. Sales are expected to total over $9 billion in 2009, based on volume growth and price changes in effect as of early 2005. The following pie charts provide a breakdown of the global oil field chemicals market by category and by region.
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Water and Sustainability in the 21st Century

Published October 2007

Report Abstract

Water supply is in a silent crisis. More than 100 cities and suburban areas around the world have inadequate water supplies. For example, each resident in Beijing can access only 10,500 cubic feet of water per day.
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Water Management Chemicals

Report Abstract

 

Over the next five years, global consumption of water treatment specialty chemicals is expected to grow in current dollars (not inflation adjusted) by an annual rate averaging 3.3% from a 2004 level of $7.6–8.1 billion to a total of $8.
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Biodiesel

Published September 2008

Report Abstract

iodiesel, defined as the methyl ester of natural fatty acids produced via transesterification of fats and oils, is made mainly from renewable biological resources (vegetable or animal fats and oils) and is therefore an ecologically friendly alternative to petroleum-based diesel. Biodiesel fuel is adapted to the diesel engine and may be used in standard diesel engines. Because of its excellent solvent properties, however, fuel hoses, pipes and seals must be made resistant to biodiesel, if it is used in its pure form.
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Hydrogen

Published October 2007

Report Abstract


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Chemicals from Biomass

Published November 2007

Report Abstract

This report identifies the chemicals that are produced from biomass today and compares them with those that are prepared from fossil feedstocks. Furthermore, the report examines how this source of chemicals may grow in the future. Areas where competition now or in the future is likely to occur are pointed out.
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Biodegradable Polymers

Published October 2006

Report Abstract

Biodegradable polymers constitute a loosely defined family of polymers. This report includes only polymers that producers promote as fully biodegradable and that meet international standards. In 2005, the two most important commercial biodegradable polymers were polylactide (PLA) and starch-based polymers.
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Coal Gasification

Published December 2007

Report Abstract

Coal gasification is becoming industrially important worldwide to chemicals production from synthesis gas together with cogeneration of electric power; the United States and China are most important in this developing industry. PEP Report 154A, Coal Gasification (December 2006), provides screening-level technoeconomics of industrial grade syngas using the Shell Coal Gasification Process (SCGP) sized for production of 5,000 metric tons per day (MT/day) of methanol using the ICI process (412 million SCF per day syngas 2 H2: 1 CO). Report 154A discusses gasification industry developments through 2006; Report 154B updates this through 2007.
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Chemical Inputs and By-Products of Biofuels

Published May 2007

Report Abstract

Chemical Inputs and By-Products of Biofuels This report examines the impact of the biofuel industry on the chemical industry. Just as the modern chemical industry, especially petrochemicals, evolved from the growing need for petroleum-derived fuels during the last century, in this century the chemical industry will be affected by the growing production of biofuels.
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Fats and Oils Industry Overview

Published October 2005

Report Abstract

China, Malaysia, the United States, the European Union, Indonesia, India, Brazil and Argentina are notable fats and oils–producing countries, and China, the European Union and India are notable high-demand areas that must supplement regional production through imports. The following graph shows world production and consumption by country/region: Global fats and oils consumption will grow at an average annual rate of 4%, mainly as a result of growth in China and India. Growing economies, large populations and improving incomes will increase per capita demand for oils and fats in these countries.
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Methanol

Published June 2008

Report Abstract

Over the last two decades, a major shift in regional methanol capacity and production has occurred. Countries with large reserves of natural gas and often limited domestic consumption have built world-scale methanol facilities to monetize their low-cost natural gas. The largest producing region/country in 2007 was China; in 2012, it will continue to have the largest capacity and be the largest producer.
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Natural Fatty Acids

Published January 2006

Report Abstract

Many new fatty acid plants have been built in Southeast Asia, which is the major source of coconut, palm and palm kernel oils used as raw materials for C8-C14 fatty acids. Altogether, producers of fatty acids from oil splitting in these countries (excluding China and India) have a total capacity of almost 2 million metric tons. Significant amounts of this increasing production are being exported to other world areas, including North America, Western Europe and Japan, all three of which are now net importers of fatty acids derived from fat and oil splitting.
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Biocatalysis

Published May 2002

Report Abstract

Biocatalysis is a term used to describe the catalytic activity of biological systems, which includes living whole cells, parts of cells and enzymes. Humans have harnessed the capabilities of biocatalysts for centuries to generate useful products. The ability of biocatalysts to selectively produce useful products under relatively mild conditions compared to its chemical catalyst counterpart make biocatalysts an interesting and powerful addition to a process synthesis "tool-box".
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Global Solvent Report: The Green Impact

Published October 2006

Report Abstract

SRI Consulting's first report on Safe & Sustainable Chemicals is now available. The initial report of this emerging series, Global Solvent Report: The Green Impact, covers the global market for solvents—products that are integral to most chemical formulations and processes.
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Lactic Acid, Its Salts and Esters

Published September 2006

Report Abstract

The United States surpassed Western Europe as the largest consumer of lactic acid in 2001–2002 with the commissioning of NatureWorks’ (formerly Cargill Dow’s) polylactic acid (PLA) plant in late 2001. At full capacity, the PLA plant would require approximately 180 thousand metric tons of lactic acid per year. In recent years, Other Asia has replaced Western Europe as the second-largest consumer of lactic acid products.
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Antioxidants

Report Abstract

The rubber-processing industry, the plastics industry, the fuel and lubricant industry, and the food and feed industry are major consumers of antioxidants. Antioxidants are part of a company’s broader portfolio of additive products designed to serve specific end-use industries. Therefore, antioxidants do not really represent an industry but can be characterized as one component of the larger chemical additives industry.
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Biocides

Report Abstract

The specialty biocides described in this report include many different chemical types that are used in a variety of end-use areas. They are linked only by their common functionality in destroying or inhibiting the growth of a broad range of microorganisms. The report excludes chemicals that are highly lethal to all living things (e.
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Food Additives

Report Abstract

The term food additive applies broadly to chemicals that are added to food, either intentionally or indirectly, to facilitate processing, maintain product consistency, extend shelf life, ensure microbiological safety, improve or maintain nutritional value, or enhance the organoleptic qualities (flavor, color and texture) of the finished products. This report covers six major product categories of food additives including thickeners and stabilizers, alternative sweeteners, colors, enzymes, shelf life extenders (including antioxidants and preservatives) and emulsifiers. During the past five years the product category “nutraceutical ingredients” has become so prominent that it will be covered in a separate SCUP report to be issued in 2005.
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Nutraceutical Ingredients

Report Abstract

The nutraceuticals industry is still in its formative period, and at present there is no universal agreement or legal definitions of the terms and designations used by this industry sector. According to the widely accepted definition, “A nutraceutical is any substance that is a food or a part of a food and provides medical or health benefits including the prevention and treatment of disease.” Products include isolated nutrients, dietary supplements and processed foods such as cereals, soups, soyfood, and beverages.
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Radiation Curable Coatings

Report Abstract

Radiation curable formulations, used as coatings, inks, and adhesives, are cross-linked by high-intensity ultraviolet (UV) or electron beam (EB) light sources. The coating formulations differ from those used in conventional paints and coatings in that the diluent (solvent) and resin (film former) used in thermally cured coatings are replaced by a reactive liquid vehicle in which a pigment and other additives may be dispersed or dissolved. In 2004, the global market for formulations of radiation curable products was estimated at 300 thousand metric tons with a value of approximately $3.
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Thermosetting Powder Coatings

Report Abstract

Powder coatings are applied to metal substrates to form highly durable and attractive finishes. They are manufactured and applied without the use of organic solvents; thus, they are highly desirable from an ecological standpoint. Most of the current interest in industrial powder coating technology (and the focus of this report) is on formulations based on thermosetting resin binders, predominantly epoxies and polyesters (saturated types with carboxyl or hydroxyl functional groups).
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Water Soluble Polymers

Report Abstract

Water-soluble polymers are found in three categories:

  • Synthetic, which are obtained by the polymerization of monomers synthesized from petroleum or natural gas precursors
  • Semisynthetic, which are manufactured by chemical derivatization of natural organic materials, generally based on a polysaccharide
  • Natural, including microbial-, plant- and animal-based materials
Water-soluble polymers are used primarily to disperse, suspend (thicken and gel), or stabilize particulate matter. However, they may perform any of the following functions:
  • Binding
  • Coagulating
  • Dispersing, suspending, stabilizing
  • Film forming
  • Flocculating
  • Lubrication and friction reduction
  • Rheology modification and control
  • Thickening, gelling
Worldwide, the value of water-soluble polymers was over $15 billion in 2006. Overall, modest growth in the consumption of water-soluble polymers is expected to continue through 2011, characterized by (1) minor displacement of semisynthetic polymers by natural polymers, particularly in food applications; (2) generally slower growth in consumption for nonfood applications; and (3) minor product innovations that will create new applications in existing market segments.
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