IHS Chemical Week
HomeTop StoriesStatisticsOngoing ResearchWhite PapersKey Industry Players
White Papers > Clean Energy Technologies

Material and Technologies for Solar Energy

Published April 2009

The development of alternative energy has become a major effort of many economies and companies. The impetus for this investment in capital and research has several major facets...
Click here for table of contents and purchasing options


Carbon Capture Via Oxycombustion

Published December 2008

One of the options currently being investigated for carbon capture from coal-fired electric power generation is to use a predominately oxygen feed to the boiler.
Click here for table of contents and purchasing options


Carbon Capture and Storage

By Citi

Download PDF

 

Oil Field Chemicals

Report Abstract

The world market for oil field chemicals, expressed in sales dollars at the service company level, reached almost $8 billion in 2004. Sales are expected to total over $9 billion in 2009, based on volume growth and price changes in effect as of early 2005. The following pie charts provide a breakdown of the global oil field chemicals market by category and by region.
Click here for table of contents and purchasing options


Hydrogen Production

Report Abstract

Hydrogen (H2) consumption has increased quite substantially during the past ten years or so. The major reason for that is the steep rise in the demand for refineries, which are now the largest consumer of H2, surpassing the market of one-time leader ammonia (see market details in Chapter 3). This change in the H2 market stems primarily from the imposition of stricter fuels quality standards, use of sourer crudes, and deeper hydroprocessing requirements of the refinery products.
Click here for table of contents and purchasing options


Materials and Chemicals for New Energy Generation

Published January 2007

Report Abstract

Alternative energy—especially sustainable energy—has attracted the attention of many in government and industry. It is seen as a way of reducing reliance on fossil fuels and reducing greenhouse gas generation.
Click here for table of contents and purchasing options


Gasoline Octane Improvers/Oxygenates

Published April 2006

Report Abstract

Gasolines with an octane rating that satisfies market requirements are produced in refineries by blending various refinery streams that differ in composition, boiling range and octane ratings. The octane number is an expression of the antiknock property of gasoline and is defined as the percentage, by volume, of isooctane (assigned an octane number of 100) that must be mixed with n-heptane (assigned an octane number of 0) in order to match the knock intensity of the fuel that is undergoing test. Until recently, methyl tertiary-butyl ether (MTBE) was the predominant oxygenate used worldwide; however, a major shift to alternative oxygenates such as ethyl alcohol (ethanol) and ETBE is starting to occur.
Click here for table of contents and purchasing options


Biodiesel

Published September 2008

Report Abstract

iodiesel, defined as the methyl ester of natural fatty acids produced via transesterification of fats and oils, is made mainly from renewable biological resources (vegetable or animal fats and oils) and is therefore an ecologically friendly alternative to petroleum-based diesel. Biodiesel fuel is adapted to the diesel engine and may be used in standard diesel engines. Because of its excellent solvent properties, however, fuel hoses, pipes and seals must be made resistant to biodiesel, if it is used in its pure form.
Click here for table of contents and purchasing options


Hydrogen

Published October 2007

Report Abstract


Click here for table of contents and purchasing options


Methanol to Olefins

Published November 2007

Report Abstract

Ethylene and propylene are by far the two largest volume chemicals produced by the petrochemicals industry. In 2006 about 110 million metric tons of ethylene and 70 million metric tons of propylene were produced worldwide. Global demand for light olefins (ethylene and propylene) is expected to grow at an annual rate of 5% for propylene and 4% for ethylene.
Click here for table of contents and purchasing options


Sulfur Removal from Petroleum Fuels

Published March 2001

Report Abstract

This report offers a complete information package concerning the petroleum and refining industry growth trends, environmental regulation trends, and new and improved technologies that can reduce the sulfur contents in gasoline to 30 parts per million (ppm) and to 15 ppm in diesel fuel. Our main focus is on new technologies that offer high sulfur removal efficiencies at little or no loss of octane in gasoline and little or no change in cetane number of diesel fuel. After comparing the merits of eight emerging new technologies, we selected the following four processes for detailed analyses and capital and production cost estimates:

  • Mobil Oil OCTGAIN(tm) process
  • Catalytic Distillation Technologies (CDTECH) column reactor process
  • Energy BioSystems biodesulfurization process
  • Phillips Petroleum S Zorb(tm) adsorption process
The report is a valuable source of information for sulfur removal technologies for refinery operators, technology licensers, equipment vendors, government regulators, process developers, engineering contractors, and any parties interested in environmental protection and improving public heath.
Click here for table of contents and purchasing options

Raw Materials for Biofuels

Published December 2006

Report Abstract

Biofuels have become one of the hottest topics of this decade. Threats of diminishing petroleum production, global warming concerns and energy security have prompted an explosion of new capacity for biofuels.
Click here for table of contents and purchasing options


Ethyl Alcohol

Published February 2008

Report Abstract

Supplies of ethanol have increased tremendously in the last few years, mainly for use as a source of renewable fuel. Use in many countries is expected to continue to rise at a rapid rate. Ethanol is usually made by the fermentation of a carbohydrate (starch, sugar or cellulose) to the alcohol, followed by distillation and other processing to make it suitable for use as fuel, solvent, chemical feedstock or for alcoholic beverage consumption.
Click here for table of contents and purchasing options


Emission Control Catalysts

Report Abstract

The previous Specialty Chemicals Update Program Catalysts report included both process and emission control catalysts. The growth and business divergence of these catalyst areas is such that it has become more effective to prepare two reports, each addressing only one area. This report focuses on emission control catalysts.
Click here for table of contents and purchasing options











 
contact us | about us | customer care | privacy policy | sitemap | advertise

ihsCopyright © 2014 IHS, Inc. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part without permission is prohibited.

North Asia Russia Southeast Asia China India/Pakistan Middle East Eastern Europe Western Europe Central America Canada USA Australia/New Zealand South America Africa